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Panettone Zuccotto Recipe

Panettone Zuccotto Recipe

  Zuccotto is an Italian dessert with origins in Florence, believed to have been inspired by the city’s famous “Duomo” (cathedral dome). Regardless of its origins, it is a dessert made throughout all of Italy, with each area adding its own regional touch, via citrus fruits, local nuts, chocolate, liqueurs and even the cake used to form the dome, resulting in vary flexible and delicious dessert.       Do not be deceived by the look of the zuccotto – it is not the prettiest dessert you’ll see around.  The elegance and creativity of this dessert is shown in how it is filled and the skill required to “turn it out” onto a serving platter, the final decorative touches and flavour …. all things you will want to show off to your guests as they will not believe you have made the dessert yourself without breaking a sweat. As mentioned above, the variations of this dessert are many and once you’ve learnt the basic steps you really can make it your own.  My version uses panettone and quality ingredients.  The decision in what to use in the filling is really the hardest part of this recipe.   Ingredients 1kg ricotta 200g whipped cream 140g caster sugar 70g candied fruit, diced 50g dark chocolate, chopped 600g panettone, cut into 2 round discs and the rest lengthways, approximately 2.5 cm thick 200g pistachio kernels 200-300ml strong black coffee, sweetened with sugar cocoa powder, for dusting icing sugar, for dusting   Instructions 1. Line a deep bowl, approximately 15cm in diameter, with clingwrap ensuring all parts are covered and allowing excess over the sides. 2. Place the ricotta into …

Involtini alla Palermitana recipe

Involtini alla Palermitana recipe

Involtini is an Italian word for a small bite of food consisting of some sort of outer layer wrapped around a filling.  Involtini can be made with meat, poultry, seafood or vegetables and with fillings like pasta, cheese, vegetables, cured meats and nuts.  This particular recipe is for the traditional involtini served in Palermo (“alla Palermitana”) and sees the Arab influence on Sicily with the use of sultanas and pine nuts in the filling. Ingredients 1 kg veal backstrap, sliced to about 5mm thick Extra virgin olive oil (to brush) 24 lemon leaves (optional) 1 large red onion, cut into quarters Breadcrumbs, for dipping For the stuffing 50g pine nuts Salt and pepper 50g sultanas 50ml extra virgin olive oil 150g pecorino cheese, grated 150g breadcrumbs 1 large red onion, chopped finely   Skewers Lemon wedges (to serve) Directions 1. Place the sultanas in a small dish of water to rehydrate for about 10 minutes.  Drain well. 2. Quickly fry the finely chopped onion in about 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil, until soft. 3. In a small bowl, add the grated cheese, breadcrumbs, pine nuts, sultanas and fried onion.    Add the remaining oil and mix well.  Season to taste.  The mixture should be quite lumpy and not compacted. 4. Flatten and soften the meat with a tenderiser or back of a knife. 5. Brush one side of the fillet with olive oil and add some of the stuffing, making sure to not overstuff. 6. Roll using the short end until a small involtino is formed.  Slice in half to form two small involtini rolls. 7. Split the quartered onion into smaller sections, so that you …

winter wine night

winter wine night

Cold nights and red wine go hand in hand like Italy and fashion. A couple of weekends ago we hosted a Winter Wine Night at Restaurant Marca. It was a night of buon mangiare, buon vino, & brava gente (Good food, good wine & good friends). There were many beautiful Italian wines to accompany a delicious four course meal. Starting with Mario’s sangria the customers progressed through a variety of Italian red wines including my personal favourite, 10 Frescobaldi Castiglioni Chianti DOCG, Toscana, Italy. The beauty of this night was having the wine paired for the customers by Mario and the team at Restaurant Marca. I think all who came would agree that everyone did a great job putting the night together. The Moreton Bay Bug entree was very well received! Frank – our MC and delightful entertainer for the night. The main was a delicious chicken roulade. Dessert was very reminiscent of a European winter, featuring cinnamon doughnuts and chestnuts to crack and share at the table! Have you been to an official Italian wine night before? I’m sure many of you have been to unofficial Italian wine nights!

zeppole di san giuseppe (st joseph’s doughnuts) italian recipe

zeppole di san giuseppe (st joseph’s doughnuts) italian recipe

St Joseph, the patron saint of Sicily is celebrated on the 19th March every year all over Italy. Palermo, a town in Sicily, puts together a feast referred to as tavolata di San Giuseppe, or St. Joseph’s table which consists of tutto quello che esiste (everything that exists), including every type of fruit and vegetable and fish. The reason St Joseph is loved is  because during the Middle Ages a severe drought struck Sicily. The locals prayed to St Joseph for rain to grow their crops. Their prayers were of course answered and so each year the saint is honoured with this feast. It is not uncommon to this day for Italians to pray to St. Joseph for divine intervention for ill loved ones and there is always a promise to prepare La Tavolata as thanks. St Joseph’s donuts are always included in this feast  which will be blessed by a priest and shared communally with the town. This delicious Italian donut recipe will soon become a family favourite.   Ingredients: Juice of 2 oranges Zest of one orange 1 teaspoon cinnamon Icing sugar 125 g plain flour ½ cup milk 10 g dry yeast 200 g honey (preferably a sweeter honey such as a citrus honey – not easily found in Australia, but you may be able to get an imported honey from Italy) 250 g Arborio rice Vegetable oil (enough for frying)   Method: Bring a pot of 750 ml water to boil and add a pinch of salt.  Add the rice and cook until all the water has been absorbed.  Set aside to cool. In a large bowl, mix the rice, flour, …

foods of the world – united states of america

foods of the world - united states of america

By now you should know just how much we love food. We love talking about it, looking at photos of it and of course eating it! So when friends and family go travelling the first thing we always ask is ‘How was the food?’ Recently a friend travelled along the west coast of America and from the look and sound of the food that she came across it appears that U.S.A’s reputation as being culinary challenged is quite unfounded. While the servings are large the quality of food is high if you dine at the right places.     I spent some time in New York City & the North West earlier this year and for the most part I thought the food in the States was fantastic and cheap! Have you been to the States recently? What’s your opinion on the food you came across? Love, your angel, Trudy